Tag Archives: glasses

In Living Color

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Do you remember when all there were was black and white TV’s? I do. We didn’t think about the fact that we couldn’t see the TV program in color because no one could! But I also remember when color TV’s came out and the broadcast stations would tout their wares as being “..in living color”!

Of course, the first color TV’s were great, but they certainly couldn’t hold a candle to the color TV’s of today that offer 4K Ultra High Def television with all sorts of other whiz-bangs, too. But again, we didn’t know about 4K Ultra High Def televisions when color TV’s first came out and we thought that they were great! And they were.

I have always loved colors – bold, bright, extravagant color. I don’t dress that way, but I love to see colorful things, and that’s why the glasses in today’s photo captured my eye. It was at the flea market and there they were, literally begging me to shoot them, I obliged. And they are in living color!

ON THIS DAY IN HISTORY: in 1951, a homemade device explodes at Grand Central Station in New York City, startling commuters but injuring no one. In the next few months, five more bombs were found at landmark sites around New York, including the public library. Authorities realized that this new wave of terrorist acts was the work of the Mad Bomber.

New York’s first experience with the so-called Mad Bomber was on November 16, 1940, when a pipe bomb was left in the Edison building with a note that read, “Con Edison crooks, this is for you.” More bombs were recovered in 1941, each more powerful than the last, until the Mad Bomber sent a note in December stating, “I will make no more bomb units for the duration of the war.” He went on to say that Con Edison, New York’s electric utility company, would be brought to justice in due time.

The patriotic Mad Bomber made good on his promise, although he did periodically send threatening notes to the press. After his flurry of activity in 1951, the Mad Bomber was silent until a bomb went off atRadio City Music Hall in 1954. In 1955, the Mad Bomber hit Grand Central Station, Macy’s, the RCA building and the Staten Island Ferry.

The police had no luck finding the Mad Bomber, but an investigative team working for Con Ed finally tracked him down. Looking through their employment records, they found that George Peter Metesky had been a disgruntled ex-employee since an accident in 1931. Metesky was enraged that Con Ed refused to pay disability benefits and resorted to terrorism as his revenge.

Metesky, a rather mild-mannered man, was found living with his sisters in Connecticut. He was sent to a mental institution in April 1957 where he stayed until his release in 1973.

TRIVIA FOR TODAY: A tsunami is not just one big wave, but a series of waves called a “wave train.” The time period between waves is called the “wave period” and can be between a few minutes and two hours. The first wave is usually not the strongest, and later waves, such as the fifth or sixth, may be significantly larger.

Getting Ready

Belly stuffed, feeling so full I can hardly inhale.  You, too?

What a bounty we enjoy!!!  So much to celebrate!!!

A day to be surrounded by joy, thanksgiving and love.  It doesn’t get any better.

A picture of the preparations today….hope your day was even half as wonderful as ours!

_MG_7829ON THIS DAY IN HISTORY: in 1979 a New Zealander sightseeing plane traveling over Antarctica crashes, killing all 257 people on board on this day. It was the worst airplane accident in New Zealand’s history.

During the 1970s, air travel to Antarctica became more popular, as tourists sought to view the isolated and mysterious continent at the bottom of the world firsthand. Day-long excursions from New Zealand gave people tremendous views of the Ross Ice Shelf. However, the trips did pose a danger, as flights to Antarctica can be problematic.

The vast ice plains provide virtually no visual reference points for pilots and magnetic compasses are useless so close to the South Pole. The McDonnell Douglas DC-10 that carried 257 people to Antarctica on November 28 was piloted by five officers who had no experience flying to the icy continent. To make matters even worse, the data entered into the flight profile was wrong. When this same data had been used on prior flights, no problems had been encountered because visibility was good. The poor visibility on November 28, though, led to a fatal pilot error.

As the plane headed over the Ross Ice Shelf, the pilot descended below the clouds to give the passengers a better view. The pilot was supposed to stay above 6,000 feet at all times, but went down to 1,500 feet due to the overcast skies. Because of the wrong data on the flight profile, the pilot didn’t know that his descent came right as the plane reached Mount Erebus, a 12,444-foot volcano. The plane crashed into the side of the mountain at 300 miles per hour. There were no survivors.

TRIVIA FOR TODAY:  Jaguar images and costumes were outlawed by the Catholic church in the seventeenth century because of their association with Indian religion, militia, and politics.