On a Clear Fall Morning

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I think you can capture beautiful images of foliage nearly anywhere in the fall, but sometimes it can be extra special.

Today’s image was shot on a clear, crisp fall morning when the wind was still and the sky was a high blue. Normally, I prefer to shoot when it’s overcast, but on this morning there were no clouds at all in the sky and the wind was calm…with a minor whimsy of a breeze from time to time. It led to some great reflections that I’ll be sharing more of in the next few days.

I also recently went to Washington, DC and got some fun shots there, too, so my cupboard has been restocked with images to share with you (for better or worse)!!!!

ON THIS DAY IN  HISTORY: in 1703, an unusual storm system finally dissipated over England after wreaking havoc on the country for nearly two weeks. Featuring hurricane strength winds, the storm killed somewhere between 10,000 and 30,000 people. Hundreds of Royal Navy ships were lost to the storm, the worst in Britain’s history.

The unusual weather began on November 14 as strong winds from the Atlantic Ocean battered the south of Britain and Wales. Many homes and other buildings were damaged by the pounding winds, but the hurricane-like storm only began doing serious damage on November 26. With winds estimated at over 80 miles per hour, bricks were blown from some buildings and embedded in others. Wood beams, separated from buildings, flew through the air and killed hundreds across the south of the country. Towns such as Plymouth, Hull, Cowes, Portsmouth and Bristol were devastated.

However, the death toll really mounted when 300 Royal Navy ships anchored off the country’s southern coast—with 8,000 sailors on board—were lost. The Eddystone Lighthouse, built on a rock outcropping 14 miles from Plymouth, was felled by the storm. All of its residents, including its designer, Henry Winstanley, were killed. Huge waves on the Thames River sent water six feet higher than ever before recorded near London. More than 5,000 homes along the river were destroyed.

The author Daniel Defoe, who would later enjoy worldwide acclaim for the novel Robinson Crusoe, witnessed the storm, which he described as an “Army of Terror in its furious March.” His first book, The Storm, was published the following year.

TRIVIA FOR TODAY: Americans eat approximately 350 slices of pizza per second.

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