Inside a “Moonshine” Car

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People love their luxury cars. To some people, luxury means “fine Corinthian leather” (those of you who are old enough will remember those commercials with Ricardo Montalban – those of you who aren’t old enough can just go wash behind your ears!) Some think of luxury cars as having all the bells and whistles you can imagine: power windows, power seats that tip and slide by pressing a button, rear-facing cameras, heated seats, headlight wipers, GPS systems, tire pressure monitors, self-parking and auto-braking. I’m sure there’s a lot more that could be added to that list, but you get the idea.

Today’s photo is of the inside of one of the cars at the moonshine festival. For those of you who may not have the sharpest of eyes, yep – that’s a beer can holder attached to the dashboard and a jug for moonshine sitting in the seat. But what caught my eye was the fine upholstery.

I grew up on a farm and knew quite well what a gunny sack is. If you look closely, you’ll see that they paneled the doors, covered the seats and even the dashboard with only the finest gunny sack upholstery. Nothing was too good for the moonshiners, I guess!

ON THIS DAY IN HISTORY: in 1901, a 63-year-old schoolteacher named Annie Edson Taylor became the first person to take the plunge over Niagara Falls in a barrel.

After her husband died in the Civil War, the New York-born Taylor moved all over the U. S. before settling in Bay City, Michigan, around 1898. In July 1901, while reading an article about the Pan-American Exposition in Buffalo, she learned of the growing popularity of two enormous waterfalls located on the border of upstate New York and Canada. Strapped for cash and seeking fame, Taylor came up with the perfect attention-getting stunt: She would go over Niagara Falls in a barrel.

Taylor was not the first person to attempt the plunge over the famous falls. In October 1829, Sam Patch, known as the Yankee Leaper, survived jumping down the 175-foot Horseshoe Falls of the Niagara River, on the Canadian side of the border. More than 70 years later, Taylor chose to take the ride on her birthday, October 24. (She claimed she was in her 40s, but genealogical records later showed she was 63.) With the help of two assistants, Taylor strapped herself into a leather harness inside an old wooden pickle barrel five feet high and three feet in diameter. With cushions lining the barrel to break her fall, Taylor was towed by a small boat into the middle of the fast-flowing Niagara River and cut loose.

Knocked violently from side to side by the rapids and then propelled over the edge of Horseshoe Falls, Taylor reached the shore alive, if a bit battered, around 20 minutes after her journey began. After a brief flurry of photo-ops and speaking engagements, Taylor’s fame cooled, and she was unable to make the fortune for which she had hoped. She did, however, inspire a number of copy-cat daredevils. Between 1901 and 1995, 15 people went over the falls; 10 of them survived. Among those who died were Jesse Sharp, who took the plunge in a kayak in 1990, and Robert Overcracker, who used a jet ski in 1995. No matter the method, going over Niagara Falls is illegal, and survivors face charges and stiff fines on either side of the border.

TRIVIA FOR TODAY: Moon dust is said to smell like spent gunpowder.

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