…to Egypt

Double click to see a larger version of the image
Double click to see a larger version of the image

Picture two today from the Basilica of the Annunciation: in the story of the birth narrative of Jesus, we are told that king Herod (who was truly an evil, evil man) was insanely jealous when he learned that the wise men had come to find the “newborn king”.  As a result, he ordered the killing of all baby boys.

Two things which you may or may not know: if the killing of the boys was done in Bethlehem (or even Nazareth), it probably didn’t amount to more than a few dozen at most, as both were very small villages.  Of course, any killing would have been too much.

The other thing is that most scholars believe that this “slaughter of the innocents” may have taken as much as two years after the birth of the Christ Child.

The Biblical narrative is that Joseph was warned in a dream by an angel and he took Mary and Jesus and they fled into Egypt until Herod died and it was safe to return to Nazareth.  That flight to Egypt is the subject of today’s photo, a bronze image from the main entry doorway into the Basilica of the Annunciation in Nazareth.

ON THIS DAY IN HISTORY:  in 2002, Richard Heene, who carried out a hoax in which he told authorities his 6-year-old son Falcon had floated off in a runaway, saucer-shaped helium balloon, was sentenced to 90 days in jail in Fort Collins, Colorado. Heene’s wife Mayumi received 20 days of jail time for her role in the incident.

The so-called “Balloon Boy” saga riveted viewers around the globe two months earlier, on October 15, when it played out on live television. At around 11 a.m. that day, Richard Heene, a handyman, amateur scientist and father of three boys, called the Federal Aviation Administration to report that a large balloon in his family’s Fort Collins backyard had become untethered, and it was believed his son Falcon had crawled aboard the craft before it took flight. Minutes later, Heene phoned a local TV station, requesting a helicopter to track the balloon. A short time afterward, Mayumi Heene called 911.

The homemade silver craft was soon being tracked by search-and-rescue personnel, as well as reporters, on the ground and in the air. The Colorado National Guard launched two helicopters to follow the balloon, and a runway at Denver International Airport was briefly shut down as the balloon traveled into its flight path. At around 1:35 p.m., the craft touched down in a Colorado field after drifting a distance of some 50 miles from its starting location. Rescue officials soon discovered the balloon was empty, prompting fears that Falcon Heene had fallen from the craft during its flight. A massive ground search ensued, and later that afternoon it was announced the boy had been found safe at home, where he reportedly had been hiding.

Suspicions that the entire incident had been a hoax intensified that night, after Falcon Heene told his parents during a live interview on CNN: “You guys said we did this for the show.” Mayumi Heene later confessed to police the incident had been staged to help the family get a reality TV show. (The Heenes had previously appeared on the program “Wife Swap.”)

In November 2009, Richard Heene pleaded guilty to a felony charge of attempting to influence a public official (“to initiate a search-and-rescue mission which in turn would attract media attention,” according to an affidavit filed by prosecutors), while Mayumi Heene pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor count of making a false report. Richard Heene later claimed he pleaded guilty only to placate authorities and prevent his wife from being deported to her native Japan. In addition to jail time, the Heenes were required to perform community service and Richard Heene was later ordered to pay $36,000 in restitution for the search effort.

TRIVIA FOR TODAY:  The largest baby ever born weighed in at over 23 pounds but died just 11 hours after his birth in 1879. The largest surviving baby was born in October 2009 in Sumatra, Indonesia and weighed an astounding 19.2 pounds at birth.

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