…of a Rainy Day

Double click image for a larger version
Double click image for a larger version

Recently, the “Pineapple Express” has made a big impact on the west coast of the United States.  I do not mean to minimize the problems caused by their recent storms.  They are real and they are significant…and the rain continues to fall, hillsides to slip and slide, property to be damaged and injuries and lives at risk.  Weather can be a brutal thing!

But weather can also be a beautiful thing.  There are few things that i enjoy more (at least as a break from the routine) of an overcast, rainy day when I can sit inside and watch the rain through windows and hear it fall on the roof!

We’ve not had much rain here in Georgia for a while, but we did have some about a week ago.  We had just put up some lights on the outside, a one of the strings had slipped down so it was directly in front of one of the windows.  The lights weren’t lit but the rain was streaking the window.  It was warm and cozy inside.  A perfect December day to have a cup of hot chocolate and to take this picture!

ON THIS DAY IN HISTORY:  in 1911, Norwegian Roald Amundsen became the first explorer to reach the South Pole, beating his British rival, Robert Falcon Scott.

Amundsen, born near Oslo in 1872, was one of the great figures in polar exploration. In 1897, he was first mate on a Belgian expedition, the first ever to winter in the Antarctic. In 1903, he guided the 47-ton sloop Gjöa through the Northwest Passage and around the Canadian coast, the first navigator to accomplish the treacherous journey. Amundsen planned to be the first man to the North Pole, and he was about to embark in 1909 when he learned that the American Robert Peary had achieved the feat.

Amundsen completed his preparations and in June 1910 sailed instead for Antarctica, where the English explorer Robert F. Scott was also headed with the aim of reaching the South Pole. In early 1911, Amundsen sailed his ship into Antarctica’s Bay of Whales and set up base camp 60 miles closer to the pole than Scott. In October, both explorers set off–Amundsen using sleigh dogs, and Scott employing Siberian motor sledges, Siberian ponies, and dogs. On December 14, 1911, Amundsen’s expedition won the race to the Pole and returned safely to base camp in late January.

Scott’s expedition was less fortunate. The motor sleds broke down, the ponies had to be shot, and the dog teams were sent back as Scott and four companions continued on foot. On January 18, 1912, they reached the pole only to find that Amundsen had preceded them by over a month. Weather on the return journey was exceptionally bad–two members perished–and a storm later trapped Scott and the other two survivors in their tent only 11 miles from their base camp. Scott’s frozen body was found later that year.

After his historic Antarctic journey, Amundsen established a successful shipping business. He later attempted to become the first explorer to fly over the North Pole. In 1925, in an airplane, he flew within 150 miles of the goal. In 1926, he passed over the North Pole in a dirigible just three days after American explorer Richard E. Byrd had apparently done so in an aircraft. In 1996, a diary that Byrd had kept on the flight was found that seemed to suggest that the he had turned back 150 miles short of its goal because of an oil leak, making Amundsen’s dirigible expedition the first flight over the North Pole.

In 1928, Amundsen lost his life while trying to rescue a fellow explorer whose dirigible had crashed at sea near Spitsbergen, Norway.

TRIVIA FOR TODAY:  A plague epidemic swept through Europe from 1348 through 1351, killing an estimated 25–60% of Europeans. Some estimates are as high as 2/3 of the population.  The exact death toll is difficult to measure from medieval sources. The number of deaths varied considerably by area and depending on the source. Current estimates are that between 75 and 200 million people died from the plague.

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