Resting in the Yard

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Time wears on everything: it carves canyons, humbles mountains, crumbles solid rock wrinkles skin and dims vision and hearing. It doesn’t seem to matter when it comes to physical things – time marches inexorably on while exacting its toll.

An old Ford truck sits in the side yard of a Georgia house in Canton, GA. The tires are flat now, the license expired, the paint and glass worn and metal corroding. Still, there is a certain dignity to the truck as it continues to fight the ravages that will eventually claim it.

It sits on the grass, underneath a tree that has started to display leaf buds – a seeming contradiction in terms to the rusting, crumbling hulk that sits beneath its boughs. Perhaps there is a mutual agreement between the two that as the vehicle deteriorates and returns metals and other materials back to the earth from which they came, it will feed the tree and in return, the tree helps protect the vehicle from the blistering sun and drenching rain.

We all need partners.  We all need shelter. I hope you find shelter for your life in the people around you who love you.

Enjoy the picture…an HDR image that is a composite of three different exposures.  Old trucks and cars make fascinating subjects…just like life itself!

ON THIS DAY IN HISTORY:  the U.S. Army’s 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne) departed South Vietnam on this day in 1971. The Special Forces were formed to organize and train guerrilla bands behind enemy lines. President John F. Kennedy, a strong believer in the potential of the Special Forces in counterinsurgency operations, had visited the Special Warfare Center at Fort Bragg to review the program and authorized the Special Forces to wear the headgear that became their symbol, the Green Beret.

The 5th Group was sent to Vietnam in October 1964 to assume control of all Special Forces operations in Vietnam. Prior to this time, Green Berets had been assigned to Vietnam only on temporary duty. The primary function of the Green Berets in Vietnam was to organize the Civilian Irregular Defense Groups (CIDG) among South Vietnam’s Montagnard population. The Montagnards—”mountain people” or “mountaineers”—were a group of indigenous people from several tribes, such as the Rhade, Bru, and Jarai, who lived mainly in the highland areas of Vietnam. These tribes were recruited to guard camps in the mountainous border areas against North Vietnamese infiltration. At the height of the war the Green Berets oversaw 84 CIDG camps with more than 42,000 CIDG strike forces and local militia units. The CIDG program ended in December 1970 with the transfer of troops and mission to the South Vietnamese Border Ranger Command. The Green Berets were withdrawn as part of the U.S. troop reductions in Vietnam.

Just six years earlier on this same date, the US started bombing of the Ho Chi Minh trail.

TRIVIA FOR TODAY:  need a steam bath? About 20% of all volcanoes are under water. Now that’ll warm  you up!

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5 thoughts on “Resting in the Yard

  1. Thanks! You might be interested in researching and writing about “Old Car City” in White, GA. I hope to go photograph it in a couple weeks! It claims to the the world’s largest old car disposal site (over 4500 pre-1972 vehicles.)

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