Child-like Grace

I don’t know why, but all I have to do is take one look at one of my grandchildren and I fall in love with them all over again.

During my recent trip to Tucson, I found myself walking around in the airports several times and realized I was grinning from ear to ear.  Every time that happened, I’m sure I looked like an idiot, but I had good reason: each time I was thinking about one of my grandchildren.  You wanna make me smile?  Show me a picture, or describe something we did together so I can picture it in my mind’s eye, and I’ll smile like I’m full of laughing gas!!!!

Today’s photos was shot at Animal Kingdom in Orlando on our recent vacation.  My son was carrying his littlest and she was holding her nose shut.  Now, bearing in mind that we were in a zoo (of sorts): why do you think she was holding her nose?

Nah, not that.  It’s something that only a little child would do, because when we get older, we’re much to civilized and restrained by propriety.  She was holding her nose because she had a “booger”!  She went like that for a couple of minutes until her daddy figured out what was going on and resolved the problem.  Then, she was just fine, thank you very much!

(Leave it to grandpa to capture such a moment, right?!?!?!)

_MG_5156ON THIS DAY IN HISTORY: in 1933, a party of American geologists landed at the Persian Gulf port of Jubail in Saudi Arabia and begins its journey into the desert. That July, with the discovery of a massive oil field at Ghawar, Saudi King Abdel Aziz had granted the Standard Oil Company a concession to “explore and search for and drill and extract and manufacture and transport” petroleum and “kindred bituminous matter” in the country’s vast Eastern Province; in turn, Standard Oil immediately dispatched the team of scientists to locate the most profitable spot for the company to begin its drilling.

As cars and other internal-combustion engines proliferated, Standard Oil was eager to control as much of the market for gasoline as it could. As a result, it would do almost anything to have first dibs on Saudi oil. The partnership between Abdel Aziz’s government and Standard Oil became known as the Arabian American Oil Company (Aramco). The company promised to provide the Saudi government with a steady income, along with an outright payment of 50,0000 British pounds; in return, Aramco got exclusive rights to all the oil underneath the eastern desert. In 1938, the company’s gamble (after all, while Aramco engineers knew there was oil in the region, no one knew exactly where or how much) paid off: its geologists and drillers discovered oil in “commercial quantities” (no kidding, right?!?!) at the Dammam Dome, near Dhahran. The next year, Aramco exported its first tanker-load of petroleum.

In 1950, once it had become clear how very much oil there was under that desert, Aramco agreed to split its profits with the Saudi government. In 1980, after several years of squabbling over the price and availability of the country’s petroleum (Saudi Arabia was a founding member of OPEC, whose 1973 embargo precipitated a massive fuel crisis in the United States and other parts of the industrial world), Saudis won total control of the company: It’s now known as Saudi Aramco. The next year, the kingdom’s oil revenues reached $118 billion.

TRIVIA FOR TODAY: Earl Lloyd was the first black ever to play in an NBA game when he took the floor for the Washington Capitols on October 31, 1950 in Rochester, New York. Lloyd was one of three blacks to become NBA players in the 1950 season. The other two were Nat “Sweetwater” Clifton, who was signed by the New York Knicks, and Chuck Cooper, who was drafted by the Boston Celtics. Cooper debuted the night after Lloyd.

 

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